Tag Archives: Jason Gledhill

Failing to Plan or Planning to Fail?

Written by Jason Gledhill, Head of Reliable Maintenance at Lauras International

Plan-Effective-Meetings

[Source: quotesgram.com]

Those people fortunate enough to be a child in the 80’s will undoubtedly recognise the opening narration of the hugely popular A Team…

“In 1972, a crack commando unit was sent to prison by a military court for a crime they didn’t commit. These men promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, they survive as soldiers of fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them….maybe you can hire The A-Team.” [Source: IMDB Quotes]

Every week the A team were portrayed as acting on the side of the good, helping an oppressed community against a band of thugs and bullies. The programme inevitably ended with an outlandish finale with over-the-top violence (in which people were seldom seriously hurt), spectacular explosions, and jeeps being overturned.

John “Hannibal” Smith would create a complicated plan and rely on BA “I pity the fool!” Baracus, Templeton “Face” Peck and the crazy pilot “Howling Mad” Murdock to deliver its success. The ability of the team to form weaponry and vehicles out of old parts formed a focus for the last 20 minutes of the program.

How do you think Hannibal relayed his plan to the rest of the A Team?

  1. Did he keep it in his head and not tell anyone about it?
  2. Did he write it down and give it to everyone as a memo? (No e-mails back in the 80’s)
  3. Did he just tell one of the team and expect them to relay the plan between each other?
  4. Did he have a meeting with the rest of the A Team and the people who hired them?

Undoubtedly he chose option 4; and judging by the results, where the underdogs – the A Team – overcame overwhelming odds and beat the bad guys every week, without injury to themselves or the people who hired them, Hannibal’s meeting must have been highly effective.

Just take a second and ask yourself “How effective are my meetings?”

  • Do you always get the results you desired?
  • Does everyone involved in the meeting see them as value adding?
  • Do people turn up prepared?
  • Do all the actions get recorded and delivered?

If you’ve answered no to any of the above, your meetings aren’t as effective as they could be. 
So here are a few simple tips for effective meetings:

  • Have your meeting standing up
  • Lock the door after the start of your meeting
  • Keep score of the issues raised, actions assigned, actions completed on time and reviewed
  • Track how many actions have a who, when and what

And remember:

  • To value the input of each delegate
  • Make sure only one person speaks at a time
  • Never belittle anyone else’s ideas
  • 70% agreement = 100% commitment for decisions

If you would like to utter Hannibal’s immortal words “I love it when a plan comes together” then get in touch for your FREE ‘Effective Meetings Tip Card’ – call 0333 456 1988 or drop us a line to place your order contact@laurasinternational.com. 

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The Carrot Conflict


Written by Jason Gledhill, Head of Reliable Maintenance at Lauras International.

043_3500x2011_all-free-download.com_3177516Whilst preparing Sunday lunch an incident happened that highlighted the fact that clarity of instruction is key to getting a job done right first time.

The leg of lamb was in the oven slowly roasting. Beautiful roast potatoes were turning crisp on the outside whilst remaining soft and fluffy on the inside. The kitchen was filled with the intoxicating aroma of good home cooking, and children were hanging around in anticipation of purloining a roast potato whilst my back was turned.

I had just started to prepare the carrots when I realised that we had run out of mint sauce. As you are all undoubtedly aware, to eat roast lamb without mint sauce is a sin that can never be forgiven. I therefore had to go to the local shop to purchase a jar, but also needed to get the carrots peeled and chopped.

My son, Thomas, the eldest of the tribe, just happened to wander into the kitchen at that moment, probably trying to steal a roast potato, and I saw an opportunity. I could give him the chance to learn some valuable life skills by seconding him into the role of chief carrot prep chef, whilst I went to get the mint sauce.

Thomas was promptly given the task of peeling and chopping half the carrots, whilst I went to collect the mint sauce. After listing a myriad of reasons why he couldn’t perform such a task he eventually undertook the challenge once a bribe of two roast potatoes was offered.

Ten minutes later, I returned with the required mint sauce in hand. I walked into the kitchen to see my proud son standing by the counter with half the carrots chopped and peeled, and expecting his roast potato reward. There was, however, an issue.

Rather than remove half the carrots from the bag and peel and chop them, he had removed all the carrots from the bag, peeled half of each carrot and then promptly chopped the peeled half. After arguing that he hadn’t done the task as required and therefore wouldn’t get his reward, Thomas called the official adjudicator, my wife, to make a decision. After having the situation explained to her, the adjudicator looked at the chopping board and declared that although the task wasn’t performed to my expectations, half the carrots were peeled and chopped and therefor the reward had to be paid. The situation, allegedly, was my fault because my level of instruction was not adequate. I should have said remove half the carrots from the bag and fully peel and chop those that have been removed. In other words, be more unambiguous with my instruction.

Misinterpretation of instructions is a common issue in many manufacturing facilities, especially when those instructions have to pass through numerous shifts. This misinterpretation can cause loss of production, quality defects, and more seriously, health and safety issues. One of the quickest and easiest ways to get a consistent message across quickly is via a One Point Lesson, (OPL).

Click here for our Top Tips on how to create an OPL.

LaurasInternational-Carrot-OPL

 

Since the creation of a carrot preparation One Point Lessons my wife and children look at me with a sorry look in their eyes and tend to shake their heads in disbelief when I ask for someone to help with the Sunday Lunch, but at least the carrots are prepared correctly!

For more Top Tips for Manufacturing Professionals, check out our Improvement Toolkit.

Lost in France (getting nowhere fast without a Roadmap)

Written by Jason Gledhill, Head of Reliable Maintenance, Lauras International 

Whilst recently creating an Improvement Project Roadmap for a new client I was reminded of the need to update my satnav following last years holiday…

After 2 weeks of relaxation and sun in southern France it was time to drive back to Montpellier airport. We decided to leave plenty of time for the 90 minute journey and rather than take the motorway, we would see some of France via the minor roads. Six hours prior to check-in we were on our way.

Roundabout

The issue started when we reached our first round-a-bout. From the three possible exits, two would lead us to our destination, but which direction should we take? No need to worry, we had plenty of time, so we decided to take the first exit. Numerous kilometres and round-a-bouts later we realised that we were a third of the way into our journey time and we weren’t getting any closer to our destination. We had better consult the map!

Unfortunately our road map, which was kindly supplied by the care hire company, didn’t have the level of detail that would show our exact location. We knew where we wanted to be but not exactly how to get there.

The gentle sightseeing trip, with plenty of time for a relaxing lunch soon turned into a mad panic, with terse conversations and clenched jaws. Check in time was getting closer would we make it in time? What would we do if we missed the plane?

After some frantic driving and more by luck than design we managed to reach the airport, take a deep breath, and check in on time. Not a great end to an enjoyable vacation.

When starting any journey, be it travel or an Improvement Programmes, it is imperative that detailed planning is undertaken prior to taking the first steps.

As with my journey in France, the first round-a-bout or decision taken, if not correctly thought through can have undesireable consequences. The full understanding of these consequences is often not realised until it is too late and numerous other decisions have been taken based on this first poorly thought through judgement.

The more detailed the plan the more likely the journey or project will stay on track with regards to outputs and timings. As the old idiom says” le diable est dans le detail” or “the devil is in the detail”.

Regular progress reviews against these plans need to be undertaken and position against plan revised to ensure an enjoyable journey doesn’t become a mad panic.

If you’re in the process of creating an Improvement Project Roadmap and would like it sense checked, then get in touch, we’d be happy to help.