Monthly Archives: April 2016

Making Lean work in FMCG

This blog is the fifth in a series written by Jeremy Praud, Head of UK & Europe. (To start at the beginning, click here.)

Lean-and-Green-webinar-Video15 years ago, Lauras developed an approach to making Lean work in FMCG.  It was entirely results focussed – the founders had and unstinting belief that if you followed the process, you would achieve rapid and sustained improvement. 

Those of you who have come across driver tree based problem solving will know what a wonderfully logical and concise approach it is.  That’s why 15 years ago, we applied our own problem solving method to the factors that drive sustainable improvement in a factory.   The result was the SIM – the Sustainable Improvement Model.

We’ve been putting this to use in the intervening period, and as with all good driver trees, as we get new knowledge and understanding, we can refine it time and again, to evolving it to ensure nothing is missed, and the relative importance of each of the elements is understood.  After a few years, and having tested it across many different sectors, we realised that as much as the structure was common across all sectors, each sector needed its own refinement.

In particular, we noticed that the asset value against operating cost has a significant impact on the rapidity and value that certain improvement techniques bring – thus to truly ensure we could get as close to the maximum rate of improvement possible, we needed a bespoke approach for FMCG v high asset intensity sectors.

A decade down the line, with instances where clients have used the SIM to drive their improvement and in so doing have won multiple awards, the precise understanding of ‘what to do, when’ to ensure rapid and sustained manufacturing profit improvement is better understood than ever.

Since every factory is starting from a different place, the one size fits all approach just isn’t going to deliver the maximum rate of improvement for a given site.   The SIM rates each element across a 5 point scale:

  1. Not Engaged
  2. Experimenting
  3. Effective
  4. Good Practice
  5. Best Practice.

An early learning was that it is vastly more important to identify the elements that have no or little focus, and are rated as Not Engaged or Experimenting, and turn them Effective.  Where there is a lot to do, there is clear path that can be mapped out as what to prioritise in year 1, and what can wait until year 2 or 3.  The rate of improvement of a site that has merely achieved “Effective” at every level of the SIM is impressive – and this doesn’t take anything more than doing the basics well.

The M&S Plan A audit framework has become the first retailer supplier audit to review against a Lean Framework.  The first version of this framework, developed in association with the people who coined the term Lean from an academic analysis (the reasons behind Toyota’s success) is true to Classic Lean, and has yet to be tailored for FMCG.

The purpose of a Lean Audit is simple – to drive improved value, and ultimately reduced manufacturing cost.  The Manufacturers who remember this when following a retailer Lean Framework will do best and maximise the value from lean auditing.

For more discussion on making Lean work in FMCG – register for  Food Manufacture’s Lean Audit webinar (11am, Tuesday 26th April).

 

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M&S Lean Audit: What’s missing for FMCGs?

Lean-for-FMCGs-AuditThis blog is part of an editorial series written by Jeremy Praud, Head of UK & Europe.

This is now my fourth blog in the ‘Lean Audits for FMCGs’ series.  If you’d like to start at the beginning, click here.

Otherwise, lets look at two key tools that are missing from the ‘Classic Lean’ Toolkit that would deliver significant value to FMCGs, an area of focus that doesn’t belong, and one of the greatest benefits of the M&S Lean Audit Framework.

Debottlenecking is missing – yet has fastest impact on your bottom line
The major tool missing from Classic Lean that is of tremendous value within FMCG is debottlenecking theory – sometimes called the Theory of Constraints (TOC).  Pioneered by Eli Goldratt in the book “The Goal”, debottlenecking methodologies can be used to optimise line performance, and give a clear set of tactics to deliver improvement.

The average FMCG manufacturing line has approximately 9 processes.  This is many fewer than a car line – and this difference is the key reason why constraint theory doesn’t appear in the classic Lean Toolkit.  However, as a tool used to optimise speed, line control, and accumulation, it has one of the fastest impacts to the bottom line you can hope to achieve.

Improvement Systems is missing –  yet critical to sustain improvement
Good leadership and management processes are of course common across industries.  The M&S audit does a good job on most of these.  If there’s one thing the audit is light on though, it’s ensuring the right reporting is delivered easily from the right kind of measurement systems.  KPI’s are taken for granted within the audit – but all too often FMCG factories struggle with the accuracy of information.  Ensuring your measurement system is telling you to work on the right things, not the wrong things, is of critical importance and should be high on your priority list.

Supplier Relationships – not relevant for most FMCGs
Lean Audits often prioritise focus on Supplier Relationships.  For FMCG manufacturers, this requires leverage of the buyer on the supplier – and whilst this holds true in some supplier relationships, there are many where it does not.

The large enterprises have identified this, and in many instances are already trying to mimic the tactics used on them for so many years by the retailers. Whether the relationships being mimicked could be called compatible with “Lean” however is a different question.

The purpose of the Lean Audit framework should be to help you achieve a better cost to manufacture. If you are not a large enterprise, move Supplier Relations lower on list of priorities than other activity.

Improvement Champions – the real win for FMCGs
Finally, one of the greatest benefits the M&S Lean Framework will bring is the focus on having an improvement champion/manager.  The legacy of a half a century of quality audits is that the requirement for a quality department is no longer questioned. The real win will be if Lean Audits help businesses to understand that whilst continuous improvement, like quality, is everyone’s responsibility –  Improvement Champions are the key to  ensuring the processes are working, running CI workshops, and offering training and support With Improvement Champions in place, we can look forward to a continual improvement in manufacturing efficiencies, reduction in waste, and ever improving manufacturing cost per unit.

Next time I’ll be looking at how to make Lean work in FMCG. And to hear more on this subject from us, retailer M&S, and supplier Greencore – register for this Food Manufacture webinar.

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